• Police: 14-year-old behind second carjacking in Worcester

    Updated:

    WORCESTER, Mass. - Holding mace and wearing a whistle, a 63-year-old woman recounted the terrifying moments when she was the victim of an attempted carjacking outside her house. 

    She told Boston 25 News the same thing she told police, but she said she was so traumatized she didn’t want to be on camera. 

    Police say a 14-year-old boy from Worcester held a gun to the woman and tried to steal her Volvo. Officers say the woman’s panicked screams are likely what scared the boy away. 

    “Out of the 30 years I've been living here, nothing like that has ever happened,” a neighbor, Norma Brown, told us. “It was shocking. I was shocked to find out about it.”

    What’s worse is that it happened in broad daylight, around 3:30 p.m., according to police. 

    The woman and her dog were both in the car when the 14-year-old tried to steal it. 

    “I feel for her,” Brown said. “I wouldn't want that to happen to my worst enemy.”
    Longtime residents like Brown say the crime is out of the ordinary for the neighborhood, but a reason to remain on guard.

    “There was a time when it was a little rough, but this is my neighborhood,” she said. “So I'm going to keep my neighborhood as safe as possible. I’m not letting anything go down and have blind eyes to it.”

    Police say the same 14-year-old also carjacked a 51-year-old man on King Street Wednesday, but he and four other teens are now in custody and facing charges.

    MORE: 4 youths charged with using BB gun in Worcester carjacking


    WATCH BOSTON 25 NEWS


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