• 2018 Black History Art Contest Winners


    Congratulations to the 2018 Boston’s Black History Art Contest Winners:

    Samuel Stephens’ original music performance, “Let My People Go” was inspired by The Museum of the National Center of Afro-American Artists in Roxbury, a museum filled with black artistic heritage which he has visited often. He wants to continue working on his art and make more music that is positive for the Black Community. His dream is to shoot a video for his song at the NCAAA. 


    Ocyris Gomez chose the Bruce C. Bolling Municipal Building as his inspiration for his song, “Motivation” because he feels it is a place that has brought positive change to Dudley Square. Whether he’s in the lobby where he can relax, do school work, meet friends or just walk through the building with beautiful art displayed on the walls, Ocyris feels the Bolling Building is a welcoming and progressive place for the community.


    Maryam Abbaz’s dance performance was inspired by Queen Latifah and the Phillis Wheatley statue on Commonwealth Avenue. She selected the first African-American published poet because of all she accomplished in her difficult life. Through all her hardships and undervalued life, Phyllis Wheatley never let anything get in the way of pursuing her creative passion.


    Jadara WayBelmer’s poem, “Unbothered” is a call to action to “be bothered” and do something to change stigmas about how minorities are viewed. Her performance is a tribute to all the strong African-American women who’ve created change and have been part of the collective fabric of Boston’s Black History.   


    Elayia Reid used personal experience as her inspiration for her poem and mixed media art piece, “Color Blind.” The piece expresses frustrations with beauty standards held by society about African-American skin color. The piece is ultimately about learning to accept the skin you’re in. 

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