N.H. lawmakers squabble over topless ban

by: Jim Morelli Updated:

Taken at the Free the Nipple event at Hampton Beach.
MANCHESTER, N.H. - A battle is brewing in New Hampshire over nudity, specifically a law regarding women going topless, and it's become a bit personal. 
"I definitely think that in 2016 there shouldn't be any law that begins with 'a woman may not,'" said State Rep. Amanda Bouldin. 
The proposed bill that would allow cities and towns to outlaw women exposing their nipples, except in the case of breastfeeding. The legislation was filed after a movement to make female toplessness acceptable, called "Free the Nipple", came to New Hampshire last summer.
"The bill is sexist and unconstitutional. And that's all it is at the end of the day and that should be enough to kill a bill," said Bouldin, a Democrat. 
Bouldin made comments about the bill on Facebook and two of her colleagues, including the bill's sponsor, fired back. 
Rep. Josh Moore commented, "If it's a woman's natural inclination to pull her nipple out in public then you should have no problem with a man's inclination to stare at it and grab it." He later deleted his comment. 
Rep. Al Baldasaro responded, "No disrespect. But your nipple would be the last one I would want to see."
"What Al said was really rude. And it hurt my feelings a little," said Bouldin. 
Baldasaro stood by his comment Sunday.
"I'm not apologizing for nothing. I mean. I have no reason whatsoever to see the breast of a colleague," he said. 
FOX25 was unable to reach Moore for comment, who is the bill sponsor. 
Baldasaro said he doesn't agree with all aspects of the bill, but suggests the advent of public nudity in New Hampshire makes the bill necessary. When asked if he could understand why some women would be insulted by his comments, he said he could, but still supports the bill. 
"I can on the libertarians, I can on the democrats. Yeah I can. But many republican women, many in my district, believe that with nudity, there's a time and a place," he said. 
Baldasaro said that time and place is not in public in New Hampshire.
The legislature returns to session on Wednesday.